Autumnal Work On The Plot

Sunflowers and Bees

I am always saying how time is flying faster than ever, but no sooner were we into the beginning of September than we are nearing the beginning of October. The days in between just seem to be a blur. As I took myself away from the technical world, to dive into some reading as I opted for fantasy world for a time… Which at times seemed the better option than the madness we are witnessing in reality. We have had some lovely Sunny days intermingled with some Wild Winds and rain…. This week has seen the temperatures drop, rise again, and then fall again. So that Autumn nip has most definitely been in the morning air

Harvesting by the barrowload

Butternut Squash
Sweetcorn cobs
 Sweetcorn ready for freezing

Perpared SweetCorn

This was just one of the barrow loads that were prepared for the freezer . I also gave quite a few cobs away to neighbours and friends.

Dried Sweetcorn to be cleared.

Above you can see the old sweetcorn sticks now fully dried out, the plastic bottles! you may be curious about… These were planted into the ground near our courgette roots… The leaves grow so intense and thick with the courgettes we use as markers, that we then pour water into the open bottles so as to get to the roots , so as not to waste water. The bottles on top of the sticks is to prevent me poking my eyes while weeding… Despite wearing glasses, I have done this often and you do not see canes as you reach down to weed.. So this is a safety precaution.. The plastic bottles all get recycled after use also… I had cleared a lot of the mildew leaves away in the above photo shot.

Cleared Sweetcorn and digging over the ground

While Hubby was busy spreading muck/manure over where all the potatoes had been harvested, I set about clearing and digging where the sweetcorn had been… Even as I write three days after the digging my calves still ache from using the spade and turning the earth over… It was tiring, but, I enjoyed the hard work and despite the wind, managed to clear and dig what you see below in two and a half hours.

I dug all of this in two and half hours phew! Getting more grass twitch out in the process.

Sunflowers

Our Giant sunflowers have been a huge attraction to the biggest bumble bees… These now too have dried out and we have put the flower heads in the shed to try out the seeds… These we will use for bird seed in the feeders rather than for ourselves…

Onions drying out

The Onions too are all safely gathered in and they are drying out in these baskets ready for storage.. This year we have had a good crop of onions… I cannot say the same for our Leeks… For it is looking like they have been infested with a grub…. One patch of leeks we have already had to destroy as they were withering our main crop of leeks are not looking so healthy either.. This is due to what I have discovered is the leek Moth… More information on it can be found here at this link https://www.rhs.org.uk/advice/profile?PID=652

We also need to remember even if we haven’t got a garden… We can get out into nature, sit beside a tree or some water and absorb inside of ourselves all that Nature has to offer…. Its no coincidence that Nature holds similar letter as the word Nurture… For that is what Nature does… It nurtures our spirits..

Hard to imagine this place was once a huge slag heap from the local coal mine.. The pit head stocks can be seen over the trees, The Mine shut down years ago and the whole area was made into a nature reserve. Which just goes to show you no matter how dark our ugly things look now..

Things Can and Do change for the better…

I believe that there is a subtle magnetism in Nature, which, if we unconsciously yield to it, will direct us aright.

~Henry David Thoreau

February Is Here And So Is A Little Something Different

 Those of you who understand the seasons, know once the digging is done and we plant a few early seeds, like Onions, and Broad beans to get them on their way, there is not a great lot to report until planting new seedlings begins in the Spring..

Here are a couple of photos of what has been dug so far.. 

You can see lots of sprouts still to be eaten and parsnips still to dig up. And more still to be dug above  And I am proud to say I dug over that whole stretch between the sprouts.. 🙂

More was dug over and completed

So that will be it for a while on the garden… But I thought to share a few pictures in a video I made of a very special day we went to Inveraray, in Scotland a couple of years ago now… You can also find more facts too on Inveraray Jail in one of my posts 

 So Here is Something A Little Different!

Inveraray Castle is such a fairy-tale castle to look at, set in beautiful grounds.  The Castle is home to the Chief of the Clan~ Campbell.. And is the ancestral home  of the Duke of Argyll. It has been standing on the shores of Loch Fyne since the early 1400’s. 

Image result for vanbrugh

Picture Source of Vanbrugh Here

The dream  started with John  Vanbrugh, whose sketched his vision of the Castle.  However Vanbrugh then died, but his vision was then taken up by the Third Duke who started build the Castle in 1746.

The Third Duke Argyll Archibald Campbell.. Picture Image source Here ..

 

 

And who then employed the Architects Roger Morris 1695–1749 and William Adam,1689-1748. who started construction on the Castle..  But both Adam and Morris died before their construction was completed and it wasn’t until some 43 years later when the Son’s of  Adam who were Robert and James, took the castle through to its finished state. 

 Can you just imagine the type of Capital it would take to build? The opulence of such wealth even back in its day, is beyond belief, especially  during that time when people were starving and being punished and thrown into prison  for stealing bread or poaching  just to survive.  You should take a look at Inveraray Jail, I hope to post a separate video on my time spent visiting the Museum Jail in the town.  A surreal experience with full size models of people and one or two real ones that jump to life unexpectedly in my case lol.. But that is for another time.. 

John Vanbrugh’s other well known Architectural genius’s were the design of Blenheim Palace and Castle Howard

More construction was done to the Castle due to a Fire which caused damage and a third floor and the Cone shape Towers were then added in 1877. 

This stone commemorated where the Old Castle Stood before it was  destroyed in the Fire before being rebuilt

The Ground Floor is full of Arms, from Guns to Lances, swords, and other weaponry. Along with  a magnificent State Dinning Room.. ( unfortunately my picture in the video was a little blurred of the dinning room, but you can find a better one with the ground floor link. )

I hope you enjoy the little video I put together of the Castle and surrounding areas we visited.. 

Have a Wonderful Month of February Everyone.

We get one Extra Day too.. This Leap Year!… 

Gardening and Leisure Time.

I know, I know, its been more than another eight weeks since I last did an update here on my Gardening blog. And I am sure there are those of you who have unsubscribed and I wouldn’t blame you.

But Life away from the internet is what I am embracing more and more of this year, to be honest long spells on the computer drain me more than working on the plot. 

So what have we been up to. Well at the beginning of July we took a holiday and had a wonderful time exploring the Pembrokeshire Coastline  in Wales, and surrounding area, All of that to follow.

But upon our return we had to get stuck back into our home garden and of course while you are away the weeds on the plot don’t suddenly stop growing. So we trimmed back some of our home garden shrubs and trimmed our conifers and made some mulch out of it with the use of a shredder, to spread between the raspberry bushes to save on weeding.

While away we had a kind neighbour who watered our outdoor pots, and the tomatoes in the green house were well watered because of our thoughtful daughter who had bought her Dad for his birthday in June, a Solar Watering system which my hubby rigged up before we went away in the allotment greenhouse and it worked a treat..

A good thing too as the weather here the whole of July has been wonderful, Sunny days and showers, perfect growing weather, weeds and all. With the last few weeks of record high temperatures which reached 38C.. A new all time record here in the U.K.

We are back now to more seasonal temperatures and have had three days of rain, so the English weather is more or less back to normal.

After we got the garden settled. We decided to re-decorate our living room, and dinning room. This done, we then set to and redecorated the Hall, Stairs and Landing.  We finished just two days before the Heat record struck and believe me, all we did that day was rest and drink plenty of liquids. We are just not geared up for such hot weather here in England, not even the fans we put on gave much relief. Our homes don’t have air-conditioning.

So first the plot in photos, since taking these, we have picked all the peas and in total have frozen, nine pounds in weight of peas

 You should be able to click to enlarge these photo’s

Peas, lettuce, beetroot, parsnip

Shelled peas sorted, bagged and ready to freeze

 

 

 

 

 

Another view, the poppies really attracted lots of bees which was our intention

Hubby on the plot, you see how lovely the poppies were we set on purpose down the side of the allotment. The Bees loved them.

Strawberries, Onions, Potatoes

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Apples

Dahlias and sweetpeas

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Behind the sheds and compost bins we left this area wild this year for the insects and butterflies. There is a large patch of nettles butterflies like to lay eggs on. This was where the pumpkins grew last year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More Poppies, these were huge pompom poppies

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ok and now for some of the holiday photos.. Carrying on the garden theme we we visited a wonderful Castle and Garden in Wales, called Picton Castle

Picton Castle

The gardens were set in 40 acres of land from the formal walled gardens with herbaceous boarders, its herb collection, to the wonderful woodland paths that surround it which of course I just had to explore those magnificent trees.

Inside the castle was no disappointment either it was stunningly beautiful.

 

 

But for me the gardens was where the’Wealth’ lay, with the fabulous shrubs and flowers.

 

So below is a collage of the garden and for those of us gardeners who now have electric lawn mowers, give a thought to those back in the early 1900’s who had to push and pull heavy lawn mowing machinery.

We also went to the smallest City in Wales, in fact St David’s is the smallest City in the UK. but boasts a wonderful Cathedral. So the next collage of photos are some views from  St Davids and some surrounding coast line.

I hope you are all enjoying your Summer in your own gardens and exploring more of your own countryside. 

Much love and 

HAPPY GARDENING!

Walking the Track.

 

Monsal Dale Trail

She adjusted her backpack higher onto her shoulders for comfort as she walked in the drizzle that fell from a cloudy sky.

It was a humid morning and she noticed the slight headache from the pressure of the long drive, but she knew once she was on the path her head would clear. She breathed deeply and repeated her now familiar simple mantra of Sa Ta Na Ma silently to herself and as she walked, calm surrounded her being, it was going to be a good day.

The trail she had chosen was straight and even, she had walked enough rugged tracks in her life time, now all she wanted was a smooth road with no hidden surprises.

She had walked this part of the trail many times, and she never tired of it, there was always something new to see within each step of her journey. The breeze was gentle, she loved to feel it brush against her cheek, caressing her skin like an old friend. The wind always fascinated her how one moment it could be so gentle and the next it could be so fierce. Nature was always about extremes and balancing the two.

It wasn’t long before she saw a cluster of crab apple trees laden with fruit. It had been a good year for her own apples and she was grateful for their harvest.  She wondered should she take a photo of them, but her camera was in her backpack, so she left it there. She logged the sight to memory as a long ago thought of her Grandfathers allotment came into her mind. She sent him a silent thought of thanks for his own encouragement when she was a child, she loved nothing better than sitting in the wheelbarrow while he wheeled her to his plot, many happy hours were spent in among the cabbages and peas..

A station platform

The track had once been a busy railway line which had connected an important route in the Peak District from Derby to Manchester. But like so many other things, progress in the 60’s which opened up many new motorways had given rise to many railway lines and stations being closed down in 1968.  Something only time would dictate had been a huge error as now many motorways were congested with heavy goods which could have easily have been transported by the railways. She smiled at her thoughts, ‘Progress often took a step backwards’.

Just one of the bridges we need to pass in life.

Monsal Dale gorge was carved out over five million years ago by glacial melt-water or so the geologists experts say, from the last ice-age. It carved a huge valley out leaving behind the limestone layers which geologists say are over 335 million years in age. These limestone outcrops were all over the National Peak District and the woman had seen evidence with her own eyes that all had once been beneath the ocean, for hadn’t she and her friends from her childhood village found fossils  of whole fish pressed in the side of the limestone rocks in Coombes Dale near her childhood home. They had since been covered by brambles as she had tried unsuccessfully to find them, but that trail also nature had closed in on the once busy track that had led up to the long disused Sallet Hole  Mine, but which was very much active when she was a child as it mined Fluorspar. And the village had known to its cost when in 1968 one of the flotation dams which processed the fluorspar had sprung a leak and part of the village where she lived had been flooded by mud. Many people woke up that day to find their homes flooded in water and mud.

Amazing what takes root in the limestone walls that were carved out along this track.. These trees all growing in the rock face.
All we need is to seed our thoughts in the right places and allow them room to grow.

The Track she now walked had been converted into a walking and cycle path and also served as a bridal trail. And although the hour was still early in the morning already the path was becoming quite busy as people drove and then hired bikes at near by Hassop Station.  And a couple on horse back had already trotted by.

She would often played a game with people who were passing her on her walk. She would smile into the eyes of walkers as she greeted them with her ‘good morning!’. Some responded cheerfully back while others would never look up, avoiding eye contact altogether. These would often just mumble a response, surprised a stranger would speak.  She loved playing this game, and could almost guess who would speak and who would keep their eyes in a downward glance as she sensed their energy.

The Human race were a funny lot, some so closed within themselves as they shut the rest of the world out, fearing strangers. The world had taught them to mistrust and fear. She felt sad for these beings who didn’t look past their own horizons. Many walked and talked head bent, never looking up to see the scenery or wildlife around them.   This morning a happy group of what looked like foreign students had all stopped on their hired bikes. Their origins perhaps Japanese or Chinese. Each happy snapping away their selfies on long poles laughing and giggling in their own language, they were  all enjoying their biking experience. She smiled and greeted them and they respectfully greeted her back, which brought another smile to her lips. Strangers from a foreign land it seemed were more trusting of her than her own fellow countrymen and women. Yes, we’re a funny lot.

Hawthorn Berries in abundance

Her headache had disappeared as she knew it would, the drizzle had also stopped as the sun began to peek a little behind the low cloud. And as her gaze looked skyward she saw a blaze of red. Now this had her reaching in her back pack for her camera as she looked upon the magnificence red berries of the Hawthorn.

Ash Keys

This Magical tree was laden with berries, branch after branch weighed down with natures harvest for wild life. She  remembered back walking with her father who had broken off young leaves of the newly shooting hawthorn in Spring, saying they were what his father had known as Bread and Cheese. As the leaves were eaten and were filling when not much else was about.

Rose Hips

Tree after tree were full of berries, even her neighbours Rowan Tree was full of berries. Each year she would look at the signs of nature who knew exactly what she was doing. And the Rosehips too, although not as large because of the drought, they were still plenty of berries around.

It was a pity more Humans did not pay attention to what nature was doing around them, even her little hedgehog was busy collecting leaves to make a cosy place for his hibernation.

This part of the trail took her under one of many bridges over the trail which took roads over the railway track. Each bridge may look similar in size and shape. Yet each brick was placed there by different hands through blood and sweat. These bridges dated back to when the line was first constructed from 1863.  Those who worked upon the railways back then were mainly Irish Navvies, who laid the track dug out by hand and who built the tunnels.  Theirs was a hard life, full of danger and it was said nothing was thought out of the ordinary of one or two men losing their lives along each mile of track laid.

Amazing what takes root in the limestone walls that were carved out along this track.. These trees all growing in the rock face.
All we need is to seed our thoughts in the right places and allow them room to grow.

She now looked at each bridge she passed beneath with a different pair of eyes. While each bridge looked similar in construction, she now envisioned what it was like back in its day of being built. Each brick laid by a different pair of hands. Men who had left their families back in Ireland who were in search of bettering their lives, who were not afraid to leave their homeland to work.

We all have to walk our paths over which are placed many things we need to over come.. But we are all given the chance to bridge our differences..

Nothing any different from the people who leave their homelands now around the world to enter a foreign country who are also striving to better their existence.

We have so much to learn upon our journey, So much to learn about Judgement and prejudices .

Some lessons in life can look the same, Until we learn to over come them.

She looked at each bridge with new eyes, seeing we too were like bridges – each carrying our loads as it spans it own journey to get to the other side to its own destination.

Monsal Head Tunnel.. coming around the bend.

We are all walking our paths, carrying with us what we need to sustain us, All of us have walked along rough terrain at certain junctures in our lives. And some have had to walk through their own dark tunnels, not knowing how long the bend will last before we see the light at the end.

Light at the end of the Tunnel.

But when you finally emerge and you stand on your own Bridge, The Viaduct and look down, you begin to see the landscape from a whole new perspective.

You then can look back through your dark tunnel, and give thanks it led you to where you now stand.

As you look back at the tunnels you have come through . Monsal Head Tunnel.

The train had made its last journey through the tunnel carrying passengers back in ’68. But its demise had allowed thousands now to find their own feet and place them one step in front of the other along the Monsal Trail.

View from the other side of the viaduct bridge

This is the viaduct from which the view of the Valley below was taken from

View from the other side of the viaduct bridge

She hitched up her backpack once more, and began to place one foot in front of the other as she continued along the Path..

I hope you enjoyed this little story of a journey along a railway track… May all of your tracks in life be smooth and straight.. 

Happy Walking 

A Time to Plant! A Time to Paint, and a Time to Ponder.

Hello again to those who may still be following, I have been very hit and miss here over at my garden blog this year, compared with previous years.  It is looking like once a month post, so this one may be a bit longer than my usual post, we will see how it goes, so  if you are still with me at the end~  Many thanks for sticking with it and reading, 

To be honest with you, blogging has taken a back seat for a while, as I felt the need to just go within my own silent space and create and concentrate upon my well-being for a time. So I did more painting. A tiger this time, I thought I would challenge myself, as I have always put off doing a detailed painting of tiger for fear of not getting its stripes right.. So it was time to face my fears, and just let be what will be.. And this was the result. 

This was my Tiger painting in Acrylics making my trilogy of Big Cats now hung on my wall.

 

I am sure those who live here in the UK are at last glad to see a little blue sky peep between the grey blankets of cloud that have hung over us far too long.. The weather is certainly a talking point across the world as we had yet more snow at Easter followed by more rain and almost a week of fog here last week that never seemed to move..

In the distance you can see the headstocks of the Clipstone Pit which closed in 1993 More about the coal mine HERE

This was the weather Yesterday as we went for a walk Skies have been grey for so long!.. Believe it or not this was once a big ugly slag heap of waste from the coal mining days. It was turned into a nature reserve called Vicars Water Country Park  many years ago and provides a sanctuary for birds, swans ,geese and ducks.  This was the view from the top looking down.  The mist is still hanging low, but not as bad as it was last week.  To see more photos of the Park click the blue link where you can see the lake and the golden hand which symbolises a miners hand reaching out of the earth. 

While further along the yellow gorse was out along with pussy-willow

 

 At the end of last week, my hubby was feeling well enough after a nasty bout of flu over Easter to tackle the allotment.. We just had a few weeds to clear, as we had already dug over the ground in the autumn in preparation.  So while Hubby got to grips with putting in the potatoes. I got busy planting seeds. We both had lots of rest in-between, and had hot drinks, Hubby coffee, while I had drinking chocolate. 

While the weather was snowing things were busy growing in the greenhouse. Peas, Shallots and Brussels and Cabbage plants growing

Here the shallots went in last week, we covered with mesh as we have a fox who seems to like to play and dig for worms as well as deep holes into our potato rows. You can see the purple sprouting broccoli which the pigeons have devoured on the left.. They stripped nearly all of them,

We have  now put out the shallots which started life in pots in the green house, and I planted two rows of beetroot, different varieties, two rows of parsnips.. I also planted out the corms of Gladioli into a new position.

Here I planted the gladioli. many of last years corms had rotted and gone soft.. You win some and lose some.. I put the small corms in another row. hopefully they will gradually mature to larger ones to salvage for another year.

I pruned back the dead wood of the raspberries and some of the overgrown blackberries, along with pruning out the middle of the redcurrant bush and the gooseberry bush which was hard last year to pick because it was so tightly packed with thorns.

As soon as the Rhubarb showed signs of sprouting we covered with bin, and we have had two tasty crumbles so far from young shoots.

 

Here you see the peas now planted from the greenhouse, much bigger now.. I covered up the rows of beetroot and parsnips seeds I planted to protect from the fox scratching the earth.. There were a pile of chicken feathers on next doors allotment when we arrived. And a large hole in the potato row.. Looks like he likes chicken and chips.. 😉

A closer view of peas now with mesh around we use mesh instead of sticks to support them as they grow.

In the autumn we planted what was left over of the leeks, in the spaces, and we planted some garlic from a bulb.  In the space you now see created I am going to plant some of my dahlias in this patch and some further at the top of the allotment.

The following day  while hubby planted out the peas above, and put more rows of potatoes in, I set to and weeded this patch below. 

 Before: This piece took me two hours to completely clear of weeds and grass.

 After: Here you can now see the leeks I planted around the edge, and garlic in the middle

We still have to clear behind the sheds, and it looks like we may have some bees nesting below the shed again.. So I am happy about that.. And I have to straighten up between the fruit bushes. But we are at last mainly on top of the planting for now. Then I have my home garden to start on.. 

How are things growing where you are? and have you noticed big changes in your own weather patterns?  And how are your Spring Blooms doing? 

Until Next time.. 

Happy Gardening! 

 

 

Snow, Art, Sparrows and Hawks.

Hello again, and where did February go to? I can not believe I only posted once here in the whole of February. But then I have been focusing upon other things.

We did not have half as much snow as in the South and further North of us had We have been lucky, yet there was still enough snow fall to close roads and schools  were closed down for three days. 

While the Winter weather has caused disruptions and chaos on our UK roads, and for some bringing tragedy, for others its been a time to enjoy snow in parts of the UK where snow has been a rarity for many years, So for many youngsters this was the first real snow they had seen in a while.

Sledging. over a bridge on a local walk we take. My Granddaughter aged 7.  Having Fun in the snow. 

The last heavy snow fall we had been in 2010 the year my granddaughter was born.  So while we have had snow,  for many this was the first significant fall they had seen in years.

Making sure the birds do not go hungry. We moved their feeders under the bushes for protection from the sparrow hawk.

Its been important to keep feeding the wild life, who have also been suffering, we moved their feeders around a bit to help shelter them. For where they were, they were more exposed.  And Since January our garden has also had a visitor looking for food.. A Sparrow Hawk.

Sparrow Hawk in January. Now he knows where sparrows feed, he’s been trying his luck at catching them in our garden and came on two consecutive days last week in the snow. So he/she is also feeling hungry. But as far as we know he flew away empty-handed.

While winter here in the UK last week got its teeth into us with freezing temperatures and snow storms, I was huddled warm indoors painting and doodling, while I continued putting my collection of poems together and managed to write my third chapter on something I am working on.

The parts of the green house model making took a back seat for a time.  though I did spend several hours creating these flowers. They were fiddly, but absorbing.

Roses, made by winding folded paper around and around and gluing onto wire.

Here you can see a collection of flowers I made

But my main concentration has been on creating two paintings, they are already hung in my home as I swap my artwork around every now and again.  I paint purely for pleasure . So this was the first I painted, a Leopard. The second painting a Lion. Both of these Animal totems spoke to me in different ways.  And I wrote more about that on my main blog.

My Leopard painting in Acrylic.

My Lion painting in Acrylics

I hope if you have been affected by the Winter weather and storms, you have kept safe and warm where ever you are. 

 I hope Spring  starts to Stir Soon,  I can not wait to reconnect with our garden. 

Take care until next time.

 

 

Seil Island Scotland ~ Ellenabeich.

Ok, I know, this post has sat in my drafts longer than I anticipated but here is the post I promised on Seil Island.. Enjoy, as I hibernate some more in my world of model making and painting..  

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When we arrived it was a Sunday, and late in the afternoon, I gravitated towards this sign which stated that where I was standing was once the sea. But by the early 19th century, the area where I stood had been filled with the waste from the Eillan a Beitch, ( one of the old spellings of Ellenabeich. That is now the flooded Quarry behind the village cottages. The village of Ellenabeich owes its existence to the Easdale Slate.

Click on photo’s to enlarge.

Plaque containing information about Seil Island.

 

The village lay out of the streets in their present format dates from 1826. The front of the streets having been built upon the reclaimed land from the sea.

 

The cottages which are built-in slate, were the homes of the quarry workers and their families. And in their heyday back in the 19th Century they were home to more than 400 people.  The whole of Seil Island as per poll in 2001 was said to be 560.

Narrow streets between slate cottages

Cottages turned into refreshment and eating place for visitors

Slate was quarried from the early 17th century, and by the 1800 mining had become a major industry.

The introduction of Steam pumps to remove excess water came into existence around 1807 and made it possible to work in the quarries to the depths of around 80 metres.

The village of Ellenabeich Seil Island

Slate Cottages Seil Island Ellenabeich

Seil Island Hall

Over 130 million roofing slates were produced here, and at that time fetched the price of £1 to £2 per Thousand, depending upon size.  But A great storm in 1881 flooded the quarries and the slate industry quickly declined.

Part of the flooded Quarry

The harbour and slate piers were constructed for slate, at first onto sailing ships and later to steam.

Harbour Wall near Jetty just think each one hand laid.

Look at the slate used in the wall of this jetty

Easdale slate was used to roof the growing cities of Great Britain and more distant cities of the world.  The remains of the wooden steamer pier from where  this crane was removed,  can be seen by the flooded quarry.

The Crane

In 1820 Ellenabeich was a port of call for S.S. Comet, the world’s first commercial steam ship. And passenger steamers continued to call well into the 20th Century.

Seil and Easdale are but two of the Scottish Slate Islands, the other two are Belnahua and Luing, both are visible from Seil Island.

All the Islands have a fascinating history, going back to pre-Christian times.  A lovely video I  found about Seil Island Here.  Showing the crane and cottages.  I hope you enjoyed your trip around this main village on the Island, and learnt a little more about Scottish History.

Oh yes, and remember in my last post I said there was a  9 hole golf course and I walked around it..

Well here it is. 🙂

Golf course on Seil Island

Until Next Time ~Keep Warm And safe! 

A Bridge Over the Atlantic

 One of our day excursions from our hotel in Oban Scotland took us to Seil Island.

We were fascinated to learn that this island was connected by a bridge that spanned the Atlantic Ocean.This bridge was built-in the year of 1792 by Robert Mylne. When one stands close to it, you can only marvel at its construction in stonework. The bridge is called ‘Clachan Bridge’, but it is also known as The Bridge over the Atlantic.  ( If you click onto the photos they should enlarge ) 

Clachan Bridge to Seil Island It spans the Atlantic

I walked over the bridge and took photo shots  of both sides.  And aerial shot from the web, can be seen here.  And there is one also in the snow

Clachan Bridge to Seil Island.

Standing on Clachan Bridge looking North. Seil Island is on the left, the mainland to the right.

Standing on Clachan Bridge looking out over the Atlantic Ocean that flows beneath it.

The Islands main village is called Ellenabeich, it boasts its own 9 hole golf course too, which we also walked around, 🙂 But more of the village in my next post..  As I  have too many photos to show you  for one post, They show you more of the village with their neat small white terrace cottages, and can any of you remember a film called ‘The Ring of Bright Water’? about otters, well  Ellenabeich was the place it was filmed.  In my next post I will share more of Ellenabeich’s History. 

On the gardening front! our seeds arrived from the allotment association which we ordered this week. I planted my own collected sweetpea seeds in the greenhouse early in the week. Other than that, its been grey damp and chilly here in the midlands. And we have some snow forecast for midweek.. So I shall be hibernating a while longer..  

Until Next week..

as I have the next post in my drafts! Big smiles 👍 

 

 

Warmth is bringing out the Butterflies and Bees.

First may I apologies to those whose comments have been awaiting approval for so long.. At the moment I am experiencing some problems upon WordPress and I am not always receiving comments in my notification reader from this blog and my main one. Some are getting through and I think I have answered them, And others I have not seen at all.. 

It appears even when others reply to my comments that I am not always receiving their comments back and I have to back track to their blogs to see if they have answered.. So getting around blog land is taking twice as long..

Plus I have not been spending as much time on my blogs as I have been nurturing myself more these past few weeks..

But this afternoon it was such a beautiful afternoon, and I went for a short walk with my husband.. The sun was bright and warm and the sky was cloudless for a change and a beautiful blue.. The temperature had to be 16deg C this afternoon.. So very warm for this time of year.. But as we know, all things can change, and we see NY in the USA is having snow storms, which can soon travel across Jet Streams and upset the balance again.. 

My Grandmother always said never cast a clout until May is out..  The meaning of this English proverb can be found at this link to those wishing to know. For me it always meant never remove our clothing, for me in those days it was a liberty bodice lol 

Closer view of the many wonderful snowdrops out

We took the walk where the snowdrops were on my last post. They have now all finished flowering.

But We had a lovely surprise, and was accompanied for a short while by a Peacock Butterfly, who fluttered around us and then landed upon the muddy track of recent rains, to have a drink. We also saw one or two lone large Bumble Bees too, always good to see..  

Walking today, I spotted this amazing early Peacock Butterfly in the muddy track.

Peacock Butterfly today having a drink in the mud A closer view..
More about this Butterfly can be found Here at this Link

 I also want to say a warm welcome to those who have started to follow Dreamwalker’s Garden blog Please feel free to leave me your comments and I will get back to you as soon as I am able.. And many thanks for your follows.. I hope you enjoy what you see here.  

I thought I would show you how the Orchids were now looking as there is nothing much to report in the Allotment at this time.. You can see how much they have come along from this previous post in at the end of January in the post Caring for our Orchids

 Happy Gardening and Walking

~Sue~